Volume 5, Issue 4, August 2020, Page: 103-116
Enhancing Student Interactions in Online Learning: A Case of Using YouTube in a Distance Learning Module in a Higher Education Institution in Uganda
Proscovia Namubiru Ssentamu, Department of Educational Leadership and Management, School of Management Sciences, Uganda Management Institute, Kampala, Uganda
Dick Ng’ambi, Educational Technology Inquiry Lab, School of Education, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
Emily Bagarukayo, Department of Information Systems, School of Computing and Informatics Technology, College of Computing and Information Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda
Rehema Baguma, Department of Information Systems, School of Computing and Informatics Technology, College of Computing and Information Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda
Harriet Mutambo Nabushawo, Department of Open, Distance and eLearning, School of Distance and Lifelong Learning, College of Education and External Studies, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda
Christine Nalubowa, Department of Regulation and Compliance, Directorate of Regulation and Legal Services, National Information Technology Authority, Kampala, Uganda
Received: Apr. 19, 2020;       Accepted: May 14, 2020;       Published: Jun. 15, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.her.20200504.11      View  111      Downloads  80
Abstract
One of the challenges facing higher education institutions in general and Uganda in particular, is the widening gulf between increased use of technology for teaching and learning and achieving meaningful learning outcomes, especially in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this paper, we report on one use of technology where a teacher’s integration of YouTube videos in teaching increased students’ levels of interaction with the content of the video, with peers and with the instructor (teacher). Guided by the sequential mixed-method design, a series of online learning activities were designed and matched with a carefully selected YouTube video. The activity was piloted and refined for use on purposefully selected teaching staff. The staff watched the videos that were uploaded on the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and responded to online learning tasks at individual and group levels. The VLE served as a knowledge sharing space for reflections. The paper concludes that lesson design was critical in enriching the VLE with carefully selected YouTube videos. Our key recommendations are: focus on the learning outcomes, design for the desired interactions, build into the task reflections, and decide whether to pre-select YouTube videos for students or to allow students to find appropriate YouTube videos; use reflections and knowledge sharing spaces. Further work has built reflective questions in the video which allows student to pause and reflect.
Keywords
Digital Taxonomy, Distance Learning, Higher Education, Interactive Learning, Student Pedagogical Support, Virtual Learning Environment, YouTube
To cite this article
Proscovia Namubiru Ssentamu, Dick Ng’ambi, Emily Bagarukayo, Rehema Baguma, Harriet Mutambo Nabushawo, Christine Nalubowa, Enhancing Student Interactions in Online Learning: A Case of Using YouTube in a Distance Learning Module in a Higher Education Institution in Uganda, Higher Education Research. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2020, pp. 103-116. doi: 10.11648/j.her.20200504.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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