Volume 5, Issue 2, April 2020, Page: 44-51
Ship to Academe, Seafaring to Teaching: Seafarer Teachers in Maritime Higher Education Institutions in the Philippines
Emeliza Estimo, Research and Development Center, John B. Lacson Colleges Foundation, Bacolod City, Philippines
Received: Feb. 20, 2020;       Accepted: Mar. 6, 2020;       Published: Apr. 23, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.her.20200502.12      View  303      Downloads  79
Abstract
Years of working onboard vessels as marine officers to teaching in maritime schools as full-time instructors entail a big transition and a sharp turn of events in a seafarer’s role and way of life. Translating expertise in the field into a flexible classroom discourse using appropriate pedagogical methods to ensure efficient and effective delivery of instruction is a far cry from supervising and training a team of ship’s crew in a structured, hierarchical environment onboard. This descriptive study aims to measure the level of commitment of seafarers-turned-maritime instructors on their roles as educators as well as to determine their level of competence as based on their self-assessment in reference to Lloyd’s list of key attributes for maritime educators, namely, subject knowledge and technical skills, communication skills, pedagogy, and soft skills. Data that were taken from a survey with 58 deck and engine instructors revealed that the seafarers-turned-teachers have a promising potential as mentors as they help mold future seafarers. The commitment to teaching is there, and the competence to transfer to knowledge and skills is also in place. However, to be able to maximize their teaching skills, they need to constantly be abreast of the continuing developments in the maritime industry to be able to provide up-to-date inputs and to make the teaching and learning process become more realistic and relevant. As maritime instructors, they should possess the passion to perform their multifaceted roles not just to deliver the goods but to deliver them well to inspire and to create a positive attitude among their students. This study was also able to identify the challenges that seafarer teachers experience in their transition from being marine officers into maritime educators. A customized set of training courses for professional deck and engine instructors was proposed as an offshoot of this study to address the gaps that have been identified.
Keywords
Maritime Education and Training, Higher Education, Seafarer Teachers, Maritime Instructors, Teaching Competence, Soft Skills, Pedagogical Skills, Descriptive Design
To cite this article
Emeliza Estimo, Ship to Academe, Seafaring to Teaching: Seafarer Teachers in Maritime Higher Education Institutions in the Philippines, Higher Education Research. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2020, pp. 44-51. doi: 10.11648/j.her.20200502.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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