Volume 4, Issue 3, June 2019, Page: 52-56
A Review of Science and Engineering Curriculum Design for Testing, Inspection and Certification Industry
Fanny Tang, Department of Science, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Mak Shu Lun, Department of Science, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Jimmy Li, Department of Science, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Received: Jul. 31, 2019;       Accepted: Aug. 28, 2019;       Published: Sep. 11, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.her.20190403.12      View  42      Downloads  8
Abstract
Testing, Inspection and Certification (TIC) is a method of providing services to companies operating across various industrial verticals for the purpose of improving productivity, efficiency, and manufacturing process for manufacturers to meet with globally recognized standards, regulations, and policies set by governments to improve the quality of a product. Testing and inspection have increased the efficiency and productivity of various automotive organizations by reducing the cost and time for delivery, managing and controlling supply chain at each manufacturing stage, improving aftermarket sales and distribution, increasing the safety, and reducing the impact on environment. TIC plays a vital role in guaranteeing quality and credibility when dealing with these global challenges. There are substantial increasing figures indicated that there was continuous growth of the TIC industry because of its important role in the daily life of the Hong Kong community and in external trade. Although there is no further detailed explanation of these professionals’ requirements, it acknowledges that technical knowledge and skills are essential to support the development of the TIC Industry to cope with the manpower demand. The major sources to supply the manpower or professionals should be the graduates in science and engineering disciplines in higher education institutes. Hence, there is a need to review the job competency required by the TIC stakeholders, the competency standards for TIC industry, the curriculum in higher education institutes in order to find out if there is skill mismatch in TIC. This paper studies four main areas: testing, inspection and certification industry, curriculum design, competency and employability skills. It is concluded that TIC may encourage ever more students to pursue science or engineering during their undergraduate study. However, the problems in skill mismatch and skill gaps are reflected by the TIC stakeholders. Hence, greater attention may need to be given to the readiness and the extent of the current science and engineering curricula in higher education of support for undergraduates entering the TIC industry by considering the job competency requirements for TIC.
Keywords
Testing and Certification, Curriculum, Employment, Qualifications Framework, Competency
To cite this article
Fanny Tang, Mak Shu Lun, Jimmy Li, A Review of Science and Engineering Curriculum Design for Testing, Inspection and Certification Industry, Higher Education Research. Vol. 4, No. 3, 2019, pp. 52-56. doi: 10.11648/j.her.20190403.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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