Volume 3, Issue 4, August 2018, Page: 66-74
Technology Initiatives: A Shared Leadership of Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants
Anna Lissa Miranda Gonzales, General Education Department, Far Eastern University-NRMF, Quezon City, Philippines
Hernando Lintag Bernal Jr, General Education Department, Far Eastern University-NRMF, Quezon City, Philippines
Juan Miguel Ramos Reyes, General Education Department, Far Eastern University-NRMF, Quezon City, Philippines
Jeffrey Ramos Reyes, General Education Department, Far Eastern University-NRMF, Quezon City, Philippines
Mariel Mignon Ortega Tan, General Education Department, Far Eastern University-NRMF, Quezon City, Philippines
Received: Oct. 6, 2018;       Accepted: Nov. 21, 2018;       Published: Dec. 26, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.her.20180304.12      View  38      Downloads  11
Abstract
This study was designed to determine the leadership practices on technology initiatives for allied programs in medicine and utilization. It utilized descriptive – correlational method of research. Methods include teachers and students who were being interviewed. With the use of qualitative analysis, results show that shared leadership, organizational condition, staff support, and media and software are common to the teachers and learners in terms of digital natives. It also shows the impact of the leadership practices in relation to managing technology initiative. It is found out that relationship between leadership practices and its impact on the implementation and utilization of technology initiative has no significant relationship. It could be possible that administrators’ leadership focuses on relevant, timely, and regular professional development of teachers that are anchored on the school’s vision/mission which may lead to uplift the school’s academic standard in general and enhancement of students’ learning in particular. Educational leaders’ investment on human and technological resources may increase the school’s chance of gaining stakeholders’ support that may eventually lead to increase in enrolment. Students who are satisfied with the technological services being provided by the school may serve as its campaign arm to encourage more enrollees in the future.
Keywords
Healthcare, Leadership, Technology
To cite this article
Anna Lissa Miranda Gonzales, Hernando Lintag Bernal Jr, Juan Miguel Ramos Reyes, Jeffrey Ramos Reyes, Mariel Mignon Ortega Tan, Technology Initiatives: A Shared Leadership of Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants, Higher Education Research. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2018, pp. 66-74. doi: 10.11648/j.her.20180304.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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