Volume 2, Issue 2, April 2017, Page: 55-59
Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) as Catalyst for Entrepreneurial Development of Students in Polytechnics: A Case Study of Accra Polytechnic, Ghana
Lipsey Samuel Appiah Kwapong, Department of Secretaryship and Management Studies, Accra Polytechnic, Accra, Ghana
Hannah Benedicta Taylor-Abdulai, Department of Secretaryship and Management Studies, Accra Polytechnic, Accra, Ghana
Cynthia Oduro Nyarko, Department of Secretaryship and Management Studies, Accra Polytechnic, Accra, Ghana
Christine Ampofo-Ansa, Department of Secretaryship and Management Studies, Accra Polytechnic, Accra, Ghana
Emma Donkor, Department of Secretaryship and Management Studies, Accra Polytechnic, Accra, Ghana
Emelia Ohene Afriyie, Department of Secretaryship and Management Studies, Accra Polytechnic, Accra, Ghana
Received: Jan. 25, 2017;       Accepted: Feb. 10, 2017;       Published: Mar. 3, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.her.20170202.15      View  2217      Downloads  195
Abstract
This study looks at the current curriculum of two programmes run in Accra Polytechnic: namely Secretaryship and Management Studies on one hand and Fashion Design and Textiles on the other and students’ readiness towards venturing into entrepreneurial ventures. The former programme is geared towards the acquisition of skills to serve industries and businesses whilst the latter is basically the acquisition of skills geared towards entrepreneurial ventures. Since its inception, the Polytechnics have sought to train large number of graduates who have been able to be absorbed in industries and businesses whilst some have founded their businesses. Is the large number of students graduating from our Polytechnics able to set-up their own businesses? What are we doing right and what need to be improved to be able to curb the large number of unemployed youth in Ghana? This study used descriptive study design and a survey method was used to collect data using stratified sampling technique based on the population of each programme. The findings suggest that lack of entrepreneurial skill and start-up capital are the two major challenges facing students in Technical, Vocational, Education and Training (TVET) institutions. These have implications for policy makers who need to come up with relevant strategies to make TVET institutions relevant in order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 1, 4, 8, 9, 10 and 12.
Keywords
Technical, Vocational, Education and Training (TVET), Entrepreneurial, Acquisition of Skills, Strategies, Catalyst, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
To cite this article
Lipsey Samuel Appiah Kwapong, Hannah Benedicta Taylor-Abdulai, Cynthia Oduro Nyarko, Christine Ampofo-Ansa, Emma Donkor, Emelia Ohene Afriyie, Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) as Catalyst for Entrepreneurial Development of Students in Polytechnics: A Case Study of Accra Polytechnic, Ghana, Higher Education Research. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2017, pp. 55-59. doi: 10.11648/j.her.20170202.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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